5 Things You Need To Know About Hog Hunting With The Longbow

Introduction-Hog Hunting With The Longbow

When it comes to hunting feral hogs, the word tough starts getting a whole new meaning. There aren’t many animals that prove as resilient as wild hogs are against bowhunters or their gear. It can be surprising, given that feral hogs are simply domesticated pigs who have taken into the woods and adapted accordingly. So, to make sure that your hunt is successful, you’ll need to adapt as well, and we have a few tips that can help you with that.This article will explains about longbow hog hunting. It is very important to know what are technique when you want to use longbow for hog hunting.

Tips 1-Hog Hide is Tough

One of the biggest things you’ll need to remember while hunting hog with longbow is that your target has very tough skin. There’s a reason why wild hogs are hunted with spears and not bows, and that’s because wild hogs have what’s called a hog shield, or a shoulder plate. It’s basically a thick layer of tissue that protects the animal’s flanks. These shoulder plates can be as thick as 2 inches in some places, which is more than enough to protect it from some arrows.

This is why it’s important to use fixed blade arrowheads that wouldn’t break apart as it penetrates the boar’s skin. While it is possible to get a clean kill with a mechanical arrowhead on a smaller hog, it’s very likely that mechanicals will break up on a mature hog’s hide long before it penetrates it. You’ll also need a bow with a draw strength of 60 pounds or more, but since the average longbow has about as much, we shouldn’t have an issue.

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Tips 2- Hog Hunting With The Longbow-Get a Heavy Arrow

On top of using a powerful bow and an arrow that can take the impact well, you’ll also need something that packs a punch. A heavier arrow means there will be more kinetic force that can help it push through the shoulder plate. Switching to a heavier arrow may also force you to adjust your sights, but as before, since we’re using a longbow without sights, then that shouldn’t be an issue.

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Tips 3-Set up Bait

It might not come as a surprise that wild hogs are deeply food motivated. It’s always a good idea to scout out the area you’re hunting in and set feeders where you find hog signs. If you can get your hands on an automatic feeder and fill it up with corn, you can easily bait the hogs in one place, and if you can force them to stay there for an extended period of time, then all the better.

This does take a few days to set up properly and might not be an option if you’re hunting far from home, but it certainly beats slogging through the woods to track hogs. You wouldn’t need to find them at all if you can force them to come to you, and on your own terms.

Tips 4-Hog Hunting With The Longbow-Be Quiet, Stay Hidden

Feral hogs have an excellent sense of smell and their hearing isn’t half bad either. Their eyesight, however, is pretty bad, and can be their major weakness. When you’re setting up, make sure that the wind is in your face, to prevent them from taking a whiff of you and bolting. Putting on something to eliminate your odor is also a good idea.

As for their hearing, just try not to make any sudden movements. If a feral hog has had experience with hunters before, they’re very likely to bolt as soon as they hear even the slightest noise. Hogs that haven’t been hunted yet, however, are less skittish, though they are still wary.

Tips 5-Hog Hunting With The Longbow-Multiple Kills

One of the biggest advantages of bowhunting is that you can easily send off another shot after the first one struck home. This is especially useful if you’re up against hogs from untapped herds. Hogs will tend to scatter after one is felled but will usually come back after a while to finish up eating. This is why it’s important to not give your position away even if you’ve hit your target. For herds that have not been hunted before, you can get three or more hogs before the herd starts relocating deeper into the woods.

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Final Thoughts

A feral hog can be hard to kill if you’re ill equipped, especially so if you’re used to hunting deer. If you’ve botched a hit, for example, then at best they’d keep on doing what they’re doing as if nothing happened. At worst, they can panic and charge at you. If you’re in the right place with the right gear, hog hunting success is easily attainable.